3D vis of product care artefacts
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3D vis of product care artefacts

We collaborated with Arc'teryx HQ on a service design project, resolving customer pain points while supporting Arc'teryx's sustainability goals.

Context
  1. 13 week senior undergrad design project in contract with Arc'teryx in Vancouver, Canada.
My Responsibilities
  1. Research, Service Design, Industrial Design, Product Strategy, Graphic Design, 3D Visualisation
Tools
  1. Figma, Blender, Illustrator, Miro
Team
  1. Ali Rasheed, Tracy Chen, Brendan Mckay, Yan Tymoshenko

Contribution

I conducted in-person ethnography, research and interviews. I led our process of designing product care accessories. I executed their final visualisations. Co-designed graphic posters & slide decks.

Resolve

Conduct user research & ethnography to identify customer+client problems. Develop a proposal that uses UX & service design process to address and solve the problem. We were fortunate to work with two Arc'teryx branches, and the post-sales team from Arc'teryx HQ.

Arc'teryx

Design-driven High-end Active Wear & Gear

Based in Vancouver with brand stores in Asia and Europe, Arc'teryx's considers itself a design company first. The brand is committed to its goals of sustainability through its manufacturing as well as its durability-focused design and extensive repair policy.

Arc'teryx Marketing Lead

We want to minimize our impact environmentally as much as possible and make sure that we build products to last a really, really long time.

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Brand photography courtesy of Arc'teryx
Brand photography courtesy of Arc'teryx

Insights with Opportunity

Based on our ethnographic research and user interviews, we identified common patterns around product care. You can read more about the process later on.

Customers believe it is damaging to machine wash or dry their garments

Customers believe that Arc'teryx’s reputation for quality and the high price point mean that products do not need care.

Customers, (particularly those exclusively online) are unaware of proper product care procedures and available educational content, even after being provided initial opportunities to learn.

Fulcrum

A series of product care accessories that act as physical reminders for Arc'teryx product care

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Digital and analog prompts
Digital and analog prompts

Proposal Goals

Convey product care importance while dispelling misconceptions, particularly for customers with limited touchpoints with Arc'teryx.

Begin with a collectable gift

In-person, customers are provided an option to receive a collectable gift with their purchase. This gift is a physical reminder of Arc'teryx product care. For online customers, they can choose a product care gift at checkout.

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Instore Experience
Instore Experience
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Online Purchasing Experience
Online Purchasing Experience

Reinforce with a post-purchase digital reminder

An email with product care links will be sent to users who are expecting to receive their gift soon. We want users to have product care on their minds even before the product arrives.

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A product care-focused email to reinforce importance
A product care-focused email to reinforce importance

Prompt habits with a post-purchase physical trigger

Our research shows that physical items act as effective habit building triggers

Laundry Day Magnet

We used physical prototypes to determine the look and feel
We used physical prototypes to determine the look and feel
We used physical prototypes to determine the look and feel

The Laundry Day Magnet accessory is a reflexive product care guide with care instructions on the fabric. The grommet/loop is magnetic, allowing users to stick it on their laundry machines. The loop also allows users to hang the magnet on their coat hangers or wall hooks in case they don't do in-house laundry.

Trail Bandana

Products released in the 1990s by Arc'teryx & its competitors are used as product precedent.
Products released in the 1990s by Arc'teryx & its competitors are used as product precedent.
Products released in the 1990s by Arc'teryx & its competitors are used as product precedent.

As a regularly used and washed garment for hikers, the Trail Bandana accessory act as physical reminders of product care. The front side uses hiking trail patterns related to international brand store locations to provide aspirational value alongside the functional value of the product. The backside is printed with product care instructions to guide users as they build out

Brand Trust + Less Returns

Longevity of garments leading to more brand trust and loyalty. Reduced environmental impact through fewer garment replacements.

Open Research

Ethnography

Understanding how a power user cares for their jacket
Understanding how a power user cares for their jacket
Understanding how a power user cares for their jacket

I began my research by visiting and observing each store across Metro Vancouver to understand their unique positioning while in contact with the store manager and marketing leads. We took field notes, photos, and conducted interviews with sales reps regarding customer-employee interactions.

We then visited power users of Arc'teryx in their homes to understand how they took care of their gear, and their lived experience with their garments.

User interviews

To attain a nuanced understanding of Arc’teryx customers we conducted 8 qualitative interviews seeking to understand motivations, behaviors, and rituals. These included outdoor enthusiasts, urban commuters, techwear fans, and casual shoppers.

Discrepancies - Arc'teryx vs Customers

The Purchasing Journey

A journey map built from ethnography, qualitative interviews and quantitative interviews
A journey map built from ethnography, qualitative interviews and quantitative interviews

Design Decisions

The Design Journal: Design for Product Care: Enhancing Consumers’ Repair and Maintenance Activities

The Design Journal: Design for Product Care: Enhancing Consumers’ Repair and Maintenance Activities

The Design Journal: Design for Product Care: Enhancing Consumers’ Repair and Maintenance Activities

Customer Behaviour • Physical Intervention? The decision to design physical products

rather than a digital intervention was made for two reasons:

Primary research showed that customers valued and kept artifacts such as packaging and tokens from brands like Arc'teryx. Therefore a free accessory would have a more permanent place in the user's life.

Our secondary research showed that product care behaviour resulted from the confluence of three factors:

motivation (if people want to do it)
ability (if people can do it)
triggers (a stimulus that provokes them to do it)

The physical accessories are triggers, while also being a delightful item to have around, versus annoying digital notifications.

Environmentally Concious

Gore-tex scraps from Arc'teryx production
Gore-tex scraps from Arc'teryx production
Gore-tex scraps from Arc'teryx production

I designed the accessories with fabric to both remind customers of their garments, as well as make use of scrap Gore-tex fabric from Arc'teryx production, furthering Arc'teryx's sustainability goals.

I really appreciate you reading to the end. Thank you!
I really appreciate you reading to the end. Thank you!